Archive for the ‘knitting’ Category

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Turkish Bed Socks

September 8, 2014

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Here’s a fun little project I recently finished.  These little socks are super easy to make and make great use of all that sock yarn laying around. I guess a lot of people like to wear them with clogs, but I made mine just for something comfy to wear around the house.  The pattern is from Churchmouse Yarns and Teas shop on Bainbridge Island.  If you’re ever in the Seattle area, it’s a great little shop to visit. And they have a lot of terrific patterns on their website.

 

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I made little tassels to go onto mine and I really like the look.  The yarn I used is from Pagewood Farm – it’s hand dyed, super soft 80% merino, 20% nylon. The color is Lavender Fields. I used #3 circular needles and this made a perfect size for my foot, which is an 8-1/2.  I loved the pattern because there was hardly any purling and I could just go round and round on my circulars using Magic Loop.  These knit up really fast and I’m definitely going to make another pair in a different color.

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Pattern: Turkish Bed Socks
Yarn:  Pagewood Farms Sock yarn in Lavender Fields
Needle: US 3 Addi Lace Circulars
Ravelry Page

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Mitered Squares Throw With a Fabric Lining

March 3, 2014

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This is one of my favorite projects ever.  This pattern has been around for a while and I was late to the game on it.  It is the Mitered Crosses Blanket that Kay Gardiner made for Japan tsunami relief a couple of years ago.  There are over 900 project pages for it on Ravelry.  I loved this pattern so much and really loved making it.  One of the best things about this pattern is that the project, up until the time that you assemble all the blocks, is very portable.  I took these squares everywhere with we while I worked on them.

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I changed quite a few things from the original pattern, though. The original called for mitered crosses, of course.  I decided I didn’t want to do the crosses and did squares instead.  I really like the way they turned out. The squares are super easy to make and after a short time, you don’t even need the pattern.  There’s no counting of rows – yay! – you just have to remember to do the decreases on the right side and none on the wrong side. Just make sure you have a stitch marker to mark your corner, where you do your decreases.

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I also did not use Noro Silk Garden for two reasons:  I feel it’s a little scratchy and it’s very expensive.  So I searched and found a striping yarn that substituted very nicely – Crystal Palace Mochi Plus.  The colors in Mochi Plus were stunning and it was a hard decision on what colorway to use.  I loved Lake Trail and Leaves & Sprouts but eventually settled on Autumn Rainbow because I started this in the fall and the yarn exactly matched the colors I was seeing all around me.  The  yarn stripes slowly, which I really liked for this.  It is a one-ply yarn so it could be a little felty.  For the background color, I used Cascade Yarns 220 Heathers in Doeskin Heather.

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I blocked all the squares first before I sewed them together.  And I did sew them together. I did not do the three needle bind off.  I just thought that sewing them together would be a lot faster.  If you want to do the three needle bind off, be sure to read Kay’s post about how she did it.

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The i-cord edging takes a while to do but it is SO worth it. It really finished the throw. I did the edging in the striping color instead of the background color, which the pattern called for, and I really think it adds something.  It took me several days to do it, just working a little bit on it every day.  Some people are intimidated by the thought of i-cord but it’s so easy.  Here is how you do it:

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you start out with three stitches on your needle (left).  With the left
needle, pick up a stitch (right). Knit that stitch.

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You now have four stitches on your needle.  Transfer all those stitches
over to your left needle (left).  Knit the first two stitches (right).

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Knit the last two stitches together, through the back loops (left).
Now you have three stitches again.  Repeat.  Easy!

After I finished the edging, I decided the “wrong” side of the throw was so unattractive I wanted to cover it up.  Plus, I  felt the throw needed a little bit more structure.  So I decided to add a flannel fabric lining.  I wasn’t sure how to do this – I knew I could cut the fabric, hem it on my sewing machine just fine but then I wasn’t sure how to attach it.  This post from TECHKnitting helped me a lot.  It’s about how to use an overcast stitch by hand so that the stitch gives a little, which is required because of the stretchy nature of the knitting.

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the overcast stitching shows but it is still
preferable to doing a blind stitch because

it gives ease to the knitting

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name labels from  
  Ananemone Etsy shop 

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The finished blanket is about 44″ x 33″.  Each block is about 11″ square. I did 12 blocks so it’s not a huge blanket, but rather just a nice throw to put over your lap. Between the 100% wool yarn and the flannel, it’s pretty toasty.

Pattern:  Mitered Crosses Blanket
Yarn: Crystal Palace Mochi Plus in Autumn Rainbow
Cascade Yarns 220 Heathers in Doeskin Heather
Needle:  #6 Circular Addi Lace
Ravelry Page

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Yvonne’s Purple Knit Stars

January 15, 2014

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I made some of these these knitted stars last year and loved them so much that I made more last month for my friend who loves the color purple.   Her colors in her house are beautiful plums and ivories, so that’s what I made for her.

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This is an easy pattern and fun to make.  It only takes about an hour and a half to do one star.  I used various sized needles to get various sized stars.  You can stuff the yarns just with the weaved in ends or, for a puffier look, with some polyfill.

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The yarn I used was Stonehedge, which is a great soft yarn made right here in Michigan.  I love it and it comes in lots of colors.  I crocheted a little hanging loop on each star and slipped a white satin ribbon through each one so they could be hung.  These would also be pretty, though, without the hangers and just thrown in a bowl on the table.

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Pattern: Knit Stars
Needle: various for various sizes
Yarn: Shepherd’s Wool
Ravelry Page

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Knit Stars

November 23, 2012

I’m knitting these cute stars for Christmas and they are so much fun.  They are a free downloadable pattern from Webs.  I can see making these in all kinds of colors. The pattern calls for sport weight yarn, but I knitted them in worsted.  It doesn’t really matter for these – it just depends on how big you want them.

These stars use a really interesting construction.  You cast on 5 stitches and join in the round. You increase stitches as you go around and then start knitting the points by using turns and decreasing stitches.  After a few stars, I had the pattern memorized.

the ends are used as stuffing, so no weaving in!

One thing I liked about knitting these was there was no ends to weave in!  I hate weaving in ends.  You use the ends as stuffing.  So if you want the stars to be plumper, leave longer ends.

sewing the two halves together is so easy

I knit these using Magic Loop, which made it so easy.   No DPN tips to mess around with.  These were pretty fast to knit, also – one star from start to finish takes about an hour and a half.

I gave the stars a little soak after I knit them and laid them flat on a towel to block. Then I sewed the two halves together, stuffing the ends in as I went.  I crocheted a little loop at the top so I could hang them.

Wouldn’t these be cute in pinks and reds for Valentine’s Day?  I could even see knitting a bunch of them in a room’s colors and throwing them in a big bowl on a coffee table.  So many possibilities.

Pattern:  Knit Stars
needles:  US #6 circular
yarn:   Worsted Wool
Ravelry Page

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