Archive for the ‘finished objects’ Category

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Turkish Bed Socks

September 8, 2014

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Here’s a fun little project I recently finished.  These little socks are super easy to make and make great use of all that sock yarn laying around. I guess a lot of people like to wear them with clogs, but I made mine just for something comfy to wear around the house.  The pattern is from Churchmouse Yarns and Teas shop on Bainbridge Island.  If you’re ever in the Seattle area, it’s a great little shop to visit. And they have a lot of terrific patterns on their website.

 

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I made little tassels to go onto mine and I really like the look.  The yarn I used is from Pagewood Farm – it’s hand dyed, super soft 80% merino, 20% nylon. The color is Lavender Fields. I used #3 circular needles and this made a perfect size for my foot, which is an 8-1/2.  I loved the pattern because there was hardly any purling and I could just go round and round on my circulars using Magic Loop.  These knit up really fast and I’m definitely going to make another pair in a different color.

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Pattern: Turkish Bed Socks
Yarn:  Pagewood Farms Sock yarn in Lavender Fields
Needle: US 3 Addi Lace Circulars
Ravelry Page

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Crochet Squares Throw

January 21, 2014

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Well I finally got my grey crochet throw finished and I’ve written up the pattern for the square.  I had to teach myself crochet to do it, but I’m glad I did because I am a crochet fan now and have been crocheting lots of little other things, too:

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I crocheted 30 squares in all and then just crocheted them together, using a single crochet stitch.  I put a touch of purple and green here and there, but overall the color is gray which I love.

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I have gone over the pattern with a fine tooth comb so that it reads correctly.  Since I am a novice crocheter, I hope the pattern reads okay for you guys.  Let me know if there are any problems with it.

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The “Leaf” Row is probably the hardest row to get down but once you do it a few times I swear you don’t even need the pattern anymore for that row.  The “yarn overs” in that row are very fun to do, I think.  And it zips right along.

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The yarn I used produced the specific drape that I wanted in this throw.  For the first time, I didn’t use wool and it was very different.  The cotton was stiffer to work with but created a more defined stitch than most wools would.  It was a beautiful yarn from Cascade – Ultra Pima. The main color was the Taupe – go to my Ravelry page to see details.

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ELAINE’S CROCHET SQUARE:

for a printable version of this pattern click here

each square is 9 rows

(stars are repeats)

ch 5, join into ring or do Magic Ring

Row 1: Chain 2 (counts as 1 partial dc), 1 partial dc, yo and through the 2 loops, ch1. *Work 2 partial dc & then yo and through all 3 loops, ch1* 7 more times.   8 clusters total.

Row 2:  sl st to 2nd chain,  ch 1.   *1sc, 3 dc, 1 sc  in next chain loop space*.  Repeat in each ch loop around.  8 total.

Row 3:  sl st between two petals, ch 1, 1 sc in center of petal, ch 5.   *1 sc in center of next petal, ch 5.*  Repeat. 8 total. sl st to beginning ch 1.

Row 4:  * 1 sc, 5 dc, 1 sc  in the ch5  loop space *   repeat in each ch5 loop space around – 8 total.  Sl st at the beginning of the next petal

Row 5: (leaf row):  ch 1 (=1 hdc)  *ch 4, 1 sc in center of petal, ch 3.

Make  Leaf: yo twice, hook into last sc of petal, yo = 4 loops on hook.
yo and through 2 loops 2 times – 2 loops remain.
yo twice and insert hook into same sc of the petal work, yo = 5 loops on hook
yo and through 2 loops 2 times  = 3 loops remain
yo twice and insert hook into first sc of next petal, yo = 6 loops on hook.
yo and through 2 loops 2 times = 4 loops remain
yo twice and insert hook into same sc, yo = 7 loops on hook
yo and through 2 loops 2 times = 5 loops on hook
yo and through all 5 loops, (this completes 1 leaf)

ch 4,1 sc in center of dc of next petal, ch 4, 1 hdc between next 2 petals

Repeat from * 3 more times

ch 4, ending last repeat with sl st to 2nd ch at beg in rnd instead of 1 hdc.

Row 6: ch 3 (counts as 1 dc),   *4 dc in the ch 4 loop, 1 dc in the hdc.
make corner:  3 dc, , 2 tr, ch 4, 2 tr, 3 dc, 1 dc in the hdc*  repeat all the way around, ending with a 4dc and a sl st to 2nd ch at beg of round

Row 7:  ch 3 (counts as 1dc), dc in each stitch all the way around. When you come to a corner: 3 dc, ch2, 3 dc in the ch 4 space makes a corner.

sl st to 2nd ch at beg of round

Row 8:  (skip space row) ch 4 (counts as a dc) ,* sk next dc, dc in next dc, ch1  all the way across. Make  corner:  2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc in corner ch 2 space.    Repeat all the way around.

sl st to 2nd ch at beg of round

Row 9:  ch 3 (counts as 1 dc), dc in every ch 1 sp and every dc across.  Corner:  2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc

I made 30 squares and crocheted them together, just using single crochet.

For the edging, I did a series of 9 stitches all the way across, making little arches, working one stitch in every stitch on the throw:  1 sc, 2 dc, 1 tr, 2 dc, 1 sc, 2 ss.   I just repeated that little arch all the way around.

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adding the edging

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Here is the same square crocheted up in some fine linen thread that I’ve been experimenting with on a tiny crochet hook – so fun!

Crochet Squares Throw
Hook:  3.5  mm (E)
Yarn:  Cascade Ultra Pima
Ravelry Page

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Roundabout Cowl

February 5, 2013

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I’m finally getting around to posting about this fantastic cowl that I have had finished for a while.   It just took me forever to photograph it for some reason.  I couldn’t remember to accost my 16-year old son to have him model it, but I finally made it happen.  I must say, this is one of my favorite projects yet.  And it’s a free download on Ravelry!

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This cowl is knit in just four colors.  It uses two colors at a time and you end up knitting four different sections, using two different color combinations each time. On Loop Knits, they show you some possible color combinations. I used some nice blue-greys in Quince Osprey, one of my favorite all time yarns. This is one warm cowl, when you wear it doubled up.  I love it.

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This project was my brainless TV or movie knitting, where I don’t have to follow a pattern.  The only downside to this pattern is that it is not knit in the round, so there were the dreaded purls that I had to do.  But I got through them.  I did knit this on a long circular needle, which helped with the bulk of it.  You finish it up with a kitchener stitch.

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Pattern:  Roundabout Cowl
Yarn:  Quince Osprey
Needles:  US #9, 40″ circular
Ravelry Page

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Chinook Fingerless Gloves

October 1, 2012

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Can you stand another Jared Flood pattern?  I can’t believe what a roll I’m on with his designs.  What can I say  –  I love this guy’s stuff. I’ve knitted a lot of fingerless mittens but I wanted to do gloves this time, with individual fingers, but without the tips so I can still use my phone.  So when I saw his Chinook gloves, I knew this was it.

I just did one modification to the pattern –  I did not rib the fingers.   I just don’t like that K1, P1 rib for the fingers, so I did a plain stockinette stitch and knit them until I liked the length.  I did them a bit long because really, all you need is the very tip of your fingers to stick out to use your phone.  The next pair I knit may even have full pinky fingers.  I don’t care for the K1 P1 ribbing on the cuff and I may do a K2P2 ribbing on the next pair, like I did with these.

Also, I put the live stitches on stitch holders for the second glove because picking them up from waste yarn was too hard. The stitch holders were easier.  I also knit the entire glove using Magic Loop, which I love and allows me to try on the glove as I go, which you cannot do with DPNs.  I even did the individual fingers with Magic Loop – so much easier than trying to manipulate DPNs around a little finger. Using Addi Lace Turbo needles makes working with the fingering weight yarn super easy.

I did a little stash busting by using Dale of Norway Baby Ull, although it is not one of my favorite yarns. There is just something about that yarn that I don’t like – it doesn’t have enough structure or something.  I’m not buying any more of it, for sure.

As soon as I got finished with these gloves, although they were intended for me, my 16-year-old son wanted them.  What could I say – I love anyone appreciating my knitting, so off he went with them.  I would still like a pair so you’re going to see another set up here in the near future.  I’m trying to get some Quince Chickadee for my pair, but they are still having production problems.  It is a yarn so worth waiting for, though.  I love all the Quince yarns.

Pattern:  Chinook Fingerless Gloves
Needles:  US#0 and US#2 circular Addi Lace Turbos
Yarn: Baby Ull in black, white and charcoal
Ravelry Page

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Granny Stripes Blanket

September 14, 2012

Finally.  Finished.  I’ve been working on this so long. Since it didn’t require a pattern, it was my mindless knitting that I could do in the dark practically while we watch TV.  But since we don’t watch a lot of TV, it took forever!

This blanket was inspired by granny stripe blankets I saw on Ravelry.  The fun thing, too, about looking at all those blankets was all the different color combinations people used.   There are 2,286 Granny Stripes blankets on Ravelry.  You could look at them forever.  I love it!

I chose colors that would go in our bedroom.  We needed some kind of throw/blanket back there to use if someone wanted to take a nap.  I decided to use Cascade 220 Superwash Wool so I could throw it in the washer.  They also have a ton of colors in that line and I did not have a hard time selecting a few colors to perfectly match our bedspread.

I used four shades of brown and a shade of pale yellow/cream.  I decided to do a series of stripes by doing 2 stripes and then the cream, three stripes and then the cream, four stripes and then the cream, five stripes and then the cream and then reversing it.

I don’t like weaving in all those ends, though!

I crocheted until I felt the blanket was just big enough because I figure it would grow after I washed it and sure enough, it did.  It really expanded, so I have a nice big throw now.  The Cascade Superwash washes up really nicely.  I threw it in the dryer on low and came out great.

Pattern: Granny Stripes Blanket
Yarn:  Cascade 220 Superwash
Crochet Hook: #H (5.0 mm)
Ravelry Page

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Jared Flood’s Autumn Leaves

September 5, 2012

Wow – it’s been a while since I’ve posted around here but hey – something called “Summer” happened.  There was a lot of yard work to do and feeding my summer addiction.  But I was knitting.  I’ve been working on two big, long projects and finally got one of them finished – the Autumn Leaves Stole by Jared Flood.

This stole is knit in two halves and then grafted together, using kitchener stitch. I had the first half finished the first part of the year and then, after it went on a stitch holder, I got distracted and picked up some other things to knit. But discipline set in and I determined to finish the second half.  The second half just flew off the needles. Such fun to knit!

Jared’s pattern is, as usual, so well written and the chart is easy to read.  The pattern is very easy and once you get the hang of the stitch symbols, a very fast knit.  This stole can be worn as a scarf, also.  I’ve used Madelinetosh Vintage, which is a yummy yarn, so warm and soft.

Pattern:  Autumn Leaves Stole
Needles:  US 9 Circular Addi Lace Turbo (of course)
Yarn:  Madelinetosh Vintage in Bark
Ravelry Page

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Guernsey Wrap

March 13, 2012

The Guernsey Wrap is finished but – surprise – it’s a different color!  When I started this wrap, I began it in Madelinetosh Vintage (a superwash yarn) in Bark, but as I knit it up, I decided I didn’t like the color in that particular pattern.  So I ripped it out (you have to be brave when you knit) and ordered a different color for the Guernsey.  While I was waiting for that to arrive, I began knitting up the Bark in a different Jared Flood pattern – Autumn Leaves.

 

I so love his patterns. So I knitted half of the Autumn Leaves stole and then the new Madelinetosh showed up and I started the Guernsey Wrap in Moorland.  I don’t know why I didn’t like it in the Bark, but it just didn’t look right to me.

 

The pattern calls for casting on 58 stitches but I cast on an extra 12, which is 1 repeat more. In reading a lot of project notes on Ravelry, I felt like a lot of people were not getting quite the width after blocking.  I’m glad I did because even with an extra repeat and fairly aggressive blocking, the wrap is only 16″ wide!  I don’t know how the heck Jared got his to 17″ with only 58 stitches.

 

This pattern is very easy.  The charts, at first, look daunting because the symbols change every other row – how are you supposed to remember that?  Someone on Ravelry said she went through and highlighted all the purl stitches so she could remember. But a few rows into it, I realized you don’t need to do anything like that – if you remember that every single row begins with 3 knit stitches, then you know in that particular row what the knit symbol is going to be.  The purls are just the opposite symbol.  Easy!

Jared recommends a stretchy bind off and so I did Elizabeth Zimmer’s sewn bind off.  It was perfectly stretchy and easy to execute. I’m going to post how to do it as a separate follow up to this post.

Pattern:  Guernsey Wrap
Needles:  US#8 Addi Lace Circular
Yarn: Madelinetosh in Moorland
Ravelry Page

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